Halloween Craft Ideas

The time is nigh to plunge into the dark arts of Halloween decorating. Instead of getting soaked at the local party store, though, why not dig up some low-cost tools at Harbor Freight and create your own props and beasties? Here are a few ideas we’ve summoned for your morbid curiosity.

halloween packing tape ghost

This spine-chilling ghost (which will be hanging in the trees on Halloween night) is made of packing tape and cheesecloth, and shall be haunting all doomed passersby with an eerie glow, courtesy of the Mini 2-Piece 9 LED 3-1/2″ Flashlight Set (#69065), just $2.99 at Harbor Freight.

 

Drill Master 80-piece Rotary Tool KitDrill Master 80-pc. Rotary Tool Kit #69451 – $9.99

In the spirit of thinking outside the coffin…er, box… consider using the Drill Master 80 Piece Rotary Tool Kit to carve yourself an epic jack-o-lantern! Imagine the devious works of art you could create out of squash-genus vegetables. Not just for pumpkins, though, this awesome tool is great for cutting, grinding, polishing, sharpening, engraving and drilling for all kinds of Halloween crafts and hobbies. Works on metal, wood, rock, plastic, wax… and your dog’s toenails– seriously!

pumpkin

Masterpiece, compliments of the Drill Master Rotary Tool Kit!

 

4 pc wood chisel setPittsburgh 4 Piece Wood Chisel Set #42429 – $5.99

On the other hand, if you’re more old skull… dang it!– SCHOOL… this 4-piece wood chisel set is an eeeeex-cellent alternative! If you love cutting into fresh pumpkin, inhaling the rich tangy scent and getting your hands sticky-gooey whilst scooping out the guts, this would be your poison. The wood carving set slices into the pumpkin like butter as you easily control the cutting. This heat-treated, high carbon steel set has straight bevels and PVC handles for a comfortable grip, and comes in 1″, 3/4″, 1/2″ and 1/4″ sizes.

pumpkin carving

 

hot knifeChicago Electric 130-Watt Heavy Duty Hot Knife #60313 – $16.99

Plunge, slice and dismember styrofoam and more to make spooky props with this crafter’s favorite– the 130 Watt Hot Knife! Harbor Freight’s heavy-duty hot knife will make quick business out of cleanly cutting foam and plastic materials. It’s got a depth-adjusting sled for more control and a safety auto-off feature. Perfect for creating tombstones and carving faux pumpkins!

pumpkin king

Carve the Pumpkin King with your hot knife!

 

hobby woodburner

30 Watt 5-in-1 Hobby Woodburner

This woodburner is the ideal tool for the Halloween craftsman who’s soldering, working with Styrofoam, cutting stencils or burning designs into wood or leather. It comes with multiple tips for soldering and all sorts of hot cutting, all in a convenient carrying case. This quality soldering tool can contribute to almost every hobby and craft!

tombstone

Click Here for a DIY Tombstone Project!

 

propane torch

The Harbor Freight Propane Torch #91033 – $19.99

While this would have been an excellent tool for burning witches back in the day, we’ve got a whole different (and perhaps a slightly more PC) idea for Halloween: “aging” wood props! If you’re planning on having a casket or two lying around the yard, a rotting cemetery fence or some other “old” wood display, this propane torch is great for getting the right look. Here’s a customer video on how it works:

 

mini led lightHarbor Freight Tools 3-1/2″ 9 LED Mini Flashlight #69111 – $1.99

Since you’ll already be haunting your local Harbor Freight, don’t leave without grabbing a few extra omini LED lights. These suckers are perfect for the little monsters to carry while trick-or-treating, and for using to showcase tombstones, limbs, nooses and ghosties back at the castle! The mini light features a knurled barrel for quality grip and an easy push-button on/off switch to illuminate the dark passages. A convenient tool for any tomb or keep one in the hearse’s glove box.

Make Harbor Freight one of your favorite haunts this Halloween! If you don’t carve your pumpkin with a low-priced Harbor Freight tool, you’re out of your gourd!

Low Cost Auto Restoration Tools

dazed chevelle Remember back, driving your parents’ station wagon or sensible Buick, dreaming of the cool wheels beyond your reach? Cherry Bomb and header and 4-barrel carb were part of our vernacular, just not part of our lives. It’s funny how, now as we get older, we can do all the cool stuff we wanted to do when we were punk teenagers. We were car crazy, man, and many’s the time I envied the guys in the neighborhood who were out on their front lawns, working on their Dodge Challengers or GTO “Goats”—

—not just because they HAD them (which would have been enough), but because they WORKED on them. They probably borrowed their dads’ tools, saved up working shit jobs to get parts and supplies, and spent Satyurdays doing whatever it took to keep their wheels “cherry.” Nowadays, though, when you hear (and feel) a carb-powered 426 Hemi thundering down the road, it’s a geezer you’re more likely to see behind the wheel than a punk. And chances are, that geezer is one of us. Classic car restoration is more popular than ever, and with the help of online parts stores, chat forums and YouTube videos, guys who thought they’d never get to rebuild their favorite classic rides are now living the dream– in their garages (and on their lawns), doing just that. If you’ve decided to restore a vehicle yourself, I salute you. Not only will you save thousands of dollars, you’ll be embarking on a long, challenging– even therapeutic– journey that will reap rewards for years to come. But before we start doing that victory lap, to “Eye of the Tiger,” let me suggest some basic tools you’ll want right out of the gate to make the dream a reality (unless, of course, you like repeatedly going back & forth to the store when you’re in the middle of doing something): The Must-Have Tool The Air Compressor will quickly become your best friend over the course of your restoration. It’s the first thing you’ll need for your arsenal. Between the Die GrinderPaint Sprayer and Impact Wrench, you’ll get a lot of use out of it and, believe me, you’ll thank yourself every time you facea big chore that you don’t have to do manually. It needs to have a decent enough CFM—at least 5-6 CFM per minute at 90 psi– so that the long bursts of sanding, buffing or cutting won’t wear too hard on the compressor. You could get the job done with a 29-Gallon Tank Unit, but if you can swing it, go for a 60-Gallon Compressor, with power to spare. By the way, the Die Grinder is great for polishing the inside of the head ports, cleaning up metal and using with a cut-off wheel to repair panels. Air power, man… it’s a bacon-saver.

Engine Work Compression Tester will help diagnose vital motor issues, such as worn piston rings, burnt valves and bad head gaskets.  This is a great first tool to use when you get your new project car home. You can even take it with you to test a car before you buy it! While it’s not vital for the project, you may want to consider picking up a “cherry-picker” Engine Hoist, especially if you’re planning to restore more than one vehicle. A good 2-Ton Shop Crane should be sufficient, and will more than pay for itself in the long run. Most likely, you should have the cylinders re-bored. A cylinder bore gauge is needed to check for taper, out-of-round and oversize on the cylinders if you are rebuilding the motor yourself. Any critical wear on the cylinder can be reached with this gauge. An Engine Cylinder Hone will de-glaze the cylinder walls and give them a nice, smooth finish. Next, you’ll want a Valve Spring Compressor to remove the valves for a rebuild. Also a cheap valve lapping tool, with grinding compound, helps reseat the valves. Piston Ring Pliers will help you remove and replace the rings on the pistons without breaking them. A Piston Ring Compressor is needed for the installation of the pistons. Also, a piston groove cleaner will remove the carbon crud from the piston grooves. A Dial Indicator is used to measure run-out on things like the flywheel, and endplay on the crankshaft. While there are various types of mounts, including magnetic base and screw mounts, I recommend the clamping mount because it’s faster and easier to work with. Next, a Stud Puller is necessary for removing stripped, rusted and otherwise stubborn head studs, as well as exhaust & intake manifold studs. Another tool you cannot live without is the Torque Wrench—two, actually. Get both a 1/2″ drive and 3/8″ drive for your tool cabinet. These are essential to torque all your bolts to factory specs. Have a complete Tap and Die Set on hand, preferably with both SAE & metric. You’ll find this invaluable for cleaning up old bolts and restoring rusted holes. A good Digital Micrometer is needed to precisely measure anything.

Body Work MIG Welder. You won’t get through a restoration job without it. Why a MIG welder, as opposed to another type? Well, for starters, if you’re new to this kind of project, the MIG is the easiest to learn. Also, they work with the most common types of metals, overhead welding is easier, and the MIG welder works fast. You’ll also want a Hammer & Dolly Set, otherwise known as a “Body & Fender Set.” These tools go a long way in repairing and straightening steel panels, and all-around custom fab work. This one, made by Pittsburgh, probably has the best price you’re going to find, and one look at the customer reviews should convince you there’s no need to keep looking. A Step Drill is essential to make quick, clean work out of drilling large diameter holes for auto-body jobs such as installing chrome trim, and for firewall holes. A Spot Weld Cutter works great in restoration projects and does just what its name implies. Also, a Plumber’s Torch is great for softening and shaping metal. As you work on your project, you’ll find a Bench Grinder and Drill Press are extremely helpful in the auto restoration process.  Plus, a Wire Wheel on the grinder is a must and makes cleaning up parts quick and simple.

Additional Work Make sure you include various Brake Tools, a Tubing Bender and brake flare tool. Finally, get a CreeperPaint StripperTransmission JackDent Repair Kit, and a Comprehensive Mechanics Tool Kit, and you’ll be equipped to tackle most everything involved in your car restoration, as well as many other future projects. Of course, you’ll inevitably be needing cleaners, sealants, lubricants and the odd part along the way, but consider yourself the proud owner of an equipped auto restoration garage.

gremlin Now, get out there and make that Gremlin Funny Car a reality!

Spooky Halloween Costume Ideas

The Halloween season is upon us and if you’re like me, you still haven’t picked out a costume.  These days, it can be difficult to come up with something that’s both simple and unique, but we at Harbor Freight Tools are here to help!  And the best thing about picking up a “costume” at Harbor Freight, is that you can get use out of it year round.  What do I mean?  Well, let’s look at some options…

image_17240

Everyone likes a good mask.  Especially if you’re on the doorstep handing out candy to trick-or-treaters.  Luckily, Harbor Freight has a few pretty cool helmets and masks that provide a suitable creepy atmosphere for your Halloween evening.  Like the Abrasive Blasting Hood, for example.  I mean, look at this thing!  Not only is it kinda creepy, but the bright red and yellow markings make it visible and safe for nighttime wear.  And you can combine it with the Rubber Coated Blasting Gloves to enhance the look.

image_22051

Or maybe you’d opt for the Dual Cartridge Respirator.  For use in the shop, this handy mask filters out 95% of airborne particles.  But on Halloween night, it will provide 100% of nightmares after the neighborhood kids see you wearing it!  Comfortable and disposable, this is a great little mask that you can “bloody” up for All Hallow’s Eve and toss away or keep clean and use again in the future.  Either way, it’s a great addition to pretty much any costume for added spook factor.

image_17147

Going for the Leatherface look?  Well, you can terrify the town children with a simple Split Leather Welding Apron along with one of our several welding helmets.  For the best effect, I prefer the very traditional and basic auto-darkening welding helmet, but our helmets also come with several cool designs for extra style.  Check out the blue flame, racing stripe, or metal head designs to see which one sticks out for you!

image_14043

Another cool item that will enhance many costumes is the 22 ft. long Solar Rope Light.  Wrap this around a ghost or mummy costume for highlighted “creepy chains”, or perhaps around a few outdoor decorations for enhanced creepiness.  The rope light runs for a full 8 hours with a full charge so you can keep it going all Halloween night long!  In fact, the 50 long-life LED lamps automatically turn on at dusk so you can get the party started as soon as the sun goes down.

Pittsburgh 6-in. Quick Release Bar Clamp: Bar None!

6 inch quick release bar clamp

Woodworking is not a cheap hobby. Between the hand tools, power tools, wood, adhesives, fasteners and other hardware, you’re in it for a significant chunk o’ change. And, of course, as with any craft, the quality of tools is important. But does that mean to always go for the most expensive stuff? Of course not! Quality is based on performance, not price.

Consider the Pittsburgh 6″ Quick Release Bar Clamp. For woodworking, metalworking, welding and other projects, this bar clamp holds your pieces together just as well as the big name tradesman clamps that cost three times more. With a 2-1/2” throat depth, it’s constructed with a durable carbon steel bar, malleable steel jaws and a comfort grip handle for easy operation– and for just $3.29 each at Harbor Freight Tools!

But don’t take my word for it. Like I said, these little projects you’re planning are not cheap. So listen to what some of your fellow craftsmen have to say:

“Quite simply, 4 of these are better than one tradesman clamp…no contest. They are strong, quick to adjust, the pads don’t slip easily on the work surface and the pads are firmly attached so they don’t fall off. The handles are also comfortable to turn. Harbor Freight has a winner here.”  GVChiller – Greenville, NC

“This is a great all purpose clamp. I will buy more of these in the near future. It can take a good amount of pressure and the rubberized handle won’t slip in your hands. The powder coating is well done. I can’t find anything wrong and you can’t beat the price. I’ve used similar clamps and none are as good as these.”  Happy Customer – Shawnee Mission, KS

“Love these clamps, I bought 1 to see how it would hold up during construction of a wood strip canoe. Did so well, I got 10 more, plus 10 of the 12″ style. you can never have too many clamps when building a boat.”  Dave – Hyrum, UT

“For small woodworking projects, these are the perfect size, and they work just as well as the name brand big boys. I read the reviews before ordering mine, and was confident in ordering about 20 of them. Glad I did.”  The Slauterhause – PA

You’ll soon find yourself using these bar clamps all the time, for a host of projects. While you’re at it, pick up some of the 12″ Quick Release Bar Clamps for $3.99, and also a couple of the 36″ Quick Release Bar Clamps at an incredible $6.99 each! They’ll be your favorite and most-used clamps!

 

Super Streetbike Review: 1/5 HP Airbrush Compressor

When it comes to riding your motorcycle, it’s not enough that it just runs good– you gotta look good. So make sure you check out Super Streetbike’s April 2013 issue (no, not the cover, lug nut– I’m talking about YOU looking good).

On page 58 there’s a nifty article on “Helmet Painting”– a cool, inexpensive way to self-express on the road. But, as writer Brian Hatano points out, you need more than a creative idea to get your point across; it takes technique. So, he takes you through every step you probably don’t think about when  imagining that wicked skull with flames and roses… namely, preparation, detail, method and materials. To get the hang of the spray gun skills, though, Brian suggests we first get the feel of it with a practice helmet:

“For practice jobs, any helmet will work, but starting with a lid in good condition will require less initial prep and give you more time to think about designs and color combinations.”

He then breaks down the process of executing a successful paint job– from disassembling the helmet to applying the clear coat– in crystal, concise detail. Great intel to have for when you’re ready to go for it.

Interesting, however, is that even though Brian was working in a shop equipped with a large air compressor, he opted instead to go with the Central Pneumatic 1/5 HP, 58 PSI Airbrush Compressor.

“Although we had a full size compressor available, we tried out the Harbor Freight Central Pneumatic 1/5th HP Airbrush Compressor and it performed better than units costing twice as much. Zac noted the quiet motor with no pulsing in the air supply.”

Constructed of sturdy anodized aluminum, the airbrush compressor is easy to clean and operate, and changing colors is a cinch. The airbrush kit works with lacquers, oils and latex-based paints to create pro-quality designs only limited by your imagination! It comes with a 22cc glass jar, 5cc metal cop and 5-ft. air hose– and, at a low $88.99, it’ll pay for itself over and over again!

While you’re shopping, also be sure to pick up the Central Pneumatic Quick-Change Airbrush Kit for just $11.99. This enables you to switch out paints in a flash with next-to-no downtime.

This awesome setup would also be perfect for custom painting:

  • Bike frames
  • R/C and other models
  • Auto body detail art
  • Tool boxes or cabinets
  • Furniture
  • Pottery
  • Metal sculpting
  • Signs and murals
  • Crafts
  • Toys
  • Cosmetic and Halloween makeup
  • Spray tanning
  • …and so much more!

Also, of course, if you want to support the team at the big game.

 

HellDorado! Lowrider Covers a Custom Job Using the HFT English Wheel

In their upcoming May, 2013 issue, Lowrider magazine will feature a Project HellDorado installment, covering the creation of a custom dashboard and console for a ’68 Cadillac El Dorado (say that three times real fast). After the factory dash was removed, the top of the new dash was made in sections and then, using a Central Machinery English Wheel Kit With Stand from Harbor Freight Tools, the auto artisan sculpted the contours to precision.

Great choice! The 28″ throat capacity on Harbor Freight’s English wheel kit offers plenty of room to fabricate compound curves on large pieces with ease and efficiency. It’s also great for shaping, fabrication, and smoothing dents and welding seams in fenders, hoods and trunk panels. The 4” all-steel frame is more than capable for handling sheet steel to 16 gauge as well as copper and aluminum to 14 gauge. It’s easy to level and easy to use. And at $299.99– $239.99 with a 20% Off Coupon!–  it’ll do what the expensive units will do at half the price!

Whether your fashioning your ride to be a lowrider, a hot rod or just a customized thing of beauty, the Central Machinery English Wheel Kit is the perfect companion in your shop.

Gnarlatious Tips on Building Your First Bitchin’ Surfboard

Summer’s almost upon us– in about a hundred days– and if you’re like me, you’re probably asking yourself, is this the year I finally realize the dream of building my own surfboard? It may seem like a daunting task, especially for those of us who aren’t exactly Bob Vila, let alone the Big Kahuna. But, with a few swipes of the keyboard, help manifests itself once again:

Not too long ago, Stephen Pirsch, a visionary in board construction, released a book entitled,How to Build Your First Surfboard, an easy-to-follow, detail-rich DIY paper on the subject. Written for first-time builders, this guide was created to lessen problems and save money– especially to prevent the typical board-ruining mistakes.

“This book is for the garage or backyard builder who has few tools and little money.  The following information has been tested, and is the result of  friends building their first surfboard with me.  Also,  thousands of  interesting people have emailed their questions and results.”

Turn to the Equipment chapter, and there you’ll find a list of tools and supplies needed to get the project going. As this tutorial is geared towards the O Mighty Ones of Little Cash, however, Surfer Steve is careful in recommending his tools:

“Hundreds of dollars can be saved by using the following tools compared to industry standard tools. The following has been extensively tested (on 6 boards in 2012) by the author, the expense and labor solely for the benefit of you, the reader (The author already owned the industry standard tools). Be aware these tools are not designed for heavy duty, continuous production use, but will work well for the occasional garage built board.”

Drill Master 5.5 Amp 3-1/4″ Electric Planer (#91062)  (or, similar, for a few dollars more, the Chicago Electric 3-1/4″ Heavy-Duty Electric Planer with Dust Bag – #95838)

 “1. This planer has a 1/16″ maximum cutting depth. The depth can be doubled to 1/8″ by loosening the cutting blades and extending them 1/16″(the tools for this are included). The depth can be tripled to 3/16″ by grinding the front plate (the plate on the bottom which adjusts up and down). Put a 3″ abrasive cutting wheel on your drill, or a 6″ abrasive cutting blade on your sander/polisher (this tool mentioned below) and slowly grind the plate with the wheel almost parrallel to the plate – this will take one to two hours. If you over grind or grind unevenly, it can be filled with 5 minute epoxy. After modification this planer works very similar to the industry standard Hitachi

2. In contrast to surfboard foam planing shown in youtube videos, a planer is designed to be used parallel to the direction of work (not 45 degrees), Holding at 45 degrees reduces the cutting area by 1/2 which doubles your labor, and increases the possibility of an error.”

 

Chicago Electric 7″ Polisher/Sander with Digital RPM Display (#66615)

“1. (Shop for) assorted 6″ hook and loop sanding disks… if you buy from industrial suppliers you will have to buy an absurd amount of each grit.

2. Initially run sander at lowest speed, and practice on a scrap piece of foam that has been laminated and hot coated. Very slowly sand into the cloth and through the cloth, so you can see what to avoid.

NOTE 1: This purchase is worth it for the accessories alone.

NOTE 2: Hook and loop sandpaper is the best type because it is the easiest, and fastest to change and can be re – used. Hook and loop usually costs more initially (although not with this purchase), but costs less in the end, especially in cost of time.”

 

Drill Master 1/4″ Trim Router (#44914)

1. You will need a router bit with 1″ long cutter for Fins Unlimited Boxes – 1″ bits are rare.

2. A 12″x 6″x 3/16″ template can be made out of 3/16″ panel board (get 4’x 4′ piece at Lowe’s. To achieve 5 degree lean on twin or tri fins, an additional 1″x 12″ piece of 3/16″ panel board can be duct taped to the bottom edge of the template. The entire template can be held in place with Gorilla brand duct tape.

NOTE: By the time you adjust the router and bit, and make a template, you could cut out about 5 boxes by hand. After making template (and practicing) it is faster and more precise with a router. The Harbor Freight cutout tool can also be used as a router.”

 

Additional EQUIPMENT LIST:

Respirator with dust and vapor cartridges
Tape measure
Magnetic torpedo level
Drill preferably with two handles, variable speed and, 2000 to 3000 rpm.
Hand saw (wood)
Sharpie fine marker pen
Block plane (smallest)
Pocket Plane
5″ rubber/plastic back-up pad with 1/4″ shank (for sanding disks on drill)
Hacksaw blade (coarse)
Optional 1″ paddle bit to match optional 1″ leash cup

“You might be asking yourself, do I really want to do this? Is saving half the money of a showroom surfboard, buying the tools, pouring sweat, blood and time into this little venture going to be worth it? Surfer Steve has an answer for that:

“Building a board can be very rewarding.  Everyone who follows the directions manages to finish somehow, and almost everyone who makes one will make another.  Much of the work and expense on the first board (such as racks, blocks, and tools) won’t have to be duplicated on following boards.

Kowabunga, baby.

 

Dirt Biker’s Review: The 2.5 Liter Ultrasonic Cleaner

Recently, a forum member on the Honda dirt bike site XR650RForum.com, calling himself Master_E, shared with his buddies his experience with the Chicago Electric 2.5 Liter Ultrasonic Cleaner.

“So I bought this thing because I took my carb to a buddies house the first time I was taking it apart and we used his. My carb had gunk all over and was generally dirty from being used. This ultrasonic gizzmo cleaned my carb to the point where it looked fresh out of a hot tank, inside and out. I was very impressed.”

When he took it home, he tried different cleaners with it. One different work. Another was so sotrong, it would tarnish. Finally, he found the perfect “solution”:

“I went back to Harbor Freight and bought a gallon of this business they use in their regular parts washers for only $9.99. I run a 50/50 mix with water and it cleans fantastically. Straight out of the jug is pretty concentrated stuff. I really recommend diluting it some.”

And once he figured out the formula, he threw everything he could find into the cleaner.

“Since, I’ve used it on all kinds of things. Most useful to me has been on fasteners but greasy nuts, bolts, washers, brackets, spacers, sprockets, clutch and brake perches, cleaning up my tools, my carburetor components, suspension components and even a whole chain. Yes, the whole chain.”

Besides motorcycle and automotive parts, the 2.5 Ultrasonic Cleaner is great for cleaning gun parts and brass, jewelry, coins, brasswind parts, pinball machine parts, e-cigarette tanks, medals, eyeglasses, tattoo tubes, grips and tips, bionic parts, coffee ground cups, and so much more! It works with our without heat, and is programmed for five cleaning cycles. At only $74.99, it’s a great machine at a great price.

Now, back to Master_E:

“So I thought I’d share a couple before and afters. I actually struggled to find things that needed cleaning, but I did find a couple things. These parts were never prep’d or polished after coming out of the cleaner. They went straight in, ran a cycle then brought out and dried off. Thats it. No scrubbing, no brushing, no scraping, no wiping down with a rag at all.”

(Click on the pics to enlarge)

Wheel Spacers: Before…

…and After!

 

 

Upper Triple Bearing: Before…

… and After…

… and More After!

 

 

Upper Triple Clamp: Before…

… in the Cleaner (didn’t quite fit)…

… and After…

… and After!

You can’t argue with the evidence. The Chicago Electric 2.5 Liter Ultrasonic Cleaner is a perfect addition to any workshop or home where parts  and pieces get dirty. Go get yours now– and don’t forget to take a 20% Off coupon!

To quote Master_E’s parting remark:

“Cheers! Now go clean some stuff!”

Firebird Restoration Project Part 9 – Finale

Well, it’s been a long road, but we’ve finally come to the end of our journey. Behold the final video installment of the ’67 Firebird Restoration Project, executed exclusively with Harbor Freight Tools.

As I shared last week, the fully-restored ’67 Firebird pulled into our office parking lot, and let me tell you, it was a sight to see. Ever watch the Mecum Car Auctions on the Velocity Channel? (love that show!) This car would have summoned a pretty penny on their auction block. Before it was whisked away to who-knows-where, a handful of us slowly circled around it, transfixed, muttering “wows” and “oh yeahs” under our breaths. The original interior was pristine– black bucket seats and carpet looking like new. Under the hood, the same. In fact, the guy who did the restoration, Jeff Tann, said the ‘bird’s engine was better now than when it was new.

Imagine the same kind of results with your favorite Mopar or Mustang… maybe an old Apache pickup or Landcruiser. Whatever your poison, Harbor Freight Tools has got the power, air and hand tools you need for a lot less moolah than the other guys– and they’ve got the fans to prove it! Get their catalog, shop their deals, clip their coupons… you won’t be able to help grinning with all the cool stuff you’ll be taking home for so little.

So, what’s to become of the Firebird? The rumors abound. A Saudi now sheikh has it. It’s in the next Bourne movie. Elvis was seen in it at a drive-through in Lubbock, Texas. No one can say for sure… I only know I offered to take it off their hands, but haven’t heard back yet.

’67 Firebird Restoration Project: Part 8 – Assembly!

After all the hours, all the painstaking labor, all the fine details– not to mention the social hari kari– it does the heart good to see the fruits of the labor coming together. So, like Beethoven with an impact wrench, one man has labored to produce a pretty bitchin’ set of wheels.

And we’ve finally come to the eighth installment of the Harbor Freight Tools 1967 Firebird Restoration Project: Putting the car back together.

Recapping — HFT invited former Rod & Custom editor, Jeff Tann, to restore a First Generation Firebird using only products from Harbor Freight Tools. The car is all original with a 400/325-hp V8 engine, so he’s approaching the project from scratch.

We now come to the muscle car’s reassembly. For Part 8 we treat you to a slide show of all the parts coming together, until we have a beautifully restored ’67 Pontiac Firebird, better than it was when it came off the assembly line.

Whatever your labor of love, if it has to do with tools, Harbor Freight Tools has got what you need– and sends you home with extra cash in your pocket!

Next time– the final result, inside and out!

Enjoy!