New Survival Skills with Harbor Freight Solar Tools

In the late 60’s, high school teacher Eliot Wigginton and his students created Foxfire, a chronicle of traditional folk culture of the Southern Appalachians. The first Foxfire book introduced the colorful Aunt Arie and her fellow mountain folk, dispensing  their homespun knowledge of log cabin building, hog dressing, hill people crafts and food, and “other affairs of plain living.” It was soon followed by several other volumes, offering instructions on wagon making, midwifing, hide tanning, moonshining, knife making, rudimentary water systems, dressing wounds, and countless other tips on living off the land.


Now, call it a shift in political climate, call it social polarization, call it the writing on the wall: there is a renewed growing interest in personal emergency preparedness and self-reliance these days. This interest has manifest itself in everything from food storage to family disaster drills to bunkers in the woods, and there’s a new wave of voices disseminating information on how to be prepared. A lot of what’s being shared can be found in the Foxfire books, but a lot won’t. Much has been learned and developed over the past 50 years, and our ability to “fend for ourselves” has suddenly expanded and virtually become a mainstream industry.

Spotted him in my backyard this morning…

Enter the team of New Survival Skills, a hardcore, practical group of instructors that teaches greenhorns how to live in the wild. Visit their Facebook page and you’ll quickly see these guys are no boy scouts: “We are former or active U.S. Special Forces, Marines, Navy, Air Force, Law Enforcement and Fire Fighters who are now training people in survival skills.”

Team leader “Chappy” McKinney, made NSS’ mission clear:

“I want more people to see that life in the city may be hard, but life in the wilderness could kill you if you don’t know what you are doing. The skills you learn to stay alive in the wilderness relate so perfectly to everyday life. I am not saying that you will breakout with a bow drill and start a fire in your office, but you will be able to see things in such a different light that you may feel that you have been blind to the truths of everyday life.”

Recently, New Survival Skills accepted Harbor Freight’s challenge to test the Thunderbolt Magnum 13-Watt Briefcase Solar Charger (#68750), Portable Battery Solar Charger (#68690) and 1-Watt Solar Power Pack with multiple adapters for cell phones and mp3 players (#68691),  in the wild. After several days, they returned with this report:

It was awesome to learn some practical survival applications using Harbor Freight’s solar gear. I was particularly impressed how Chappy kept his cell phoned charging while hoofing it in the woods. I’m also glad he pointed out what a treasure trove of useful gear Harbor Freight Tools provides for survivalists. Even this morning, he reported from somewhere in the wilderness:

“Right now, here where I am it is 52°F with light showers, completely overcast….I have the THUNDERBOLT MAGNUM SOLAR 13 Watt Briefcase Solar Charger, from Harbor Freight Tools- item#68750 siting outside with a thin sheet of plastic sheeting over it and it is still producing 18 volts at the 12 volt setting and 33 volts on the 24 volt setting….I highly recommend this product to everyone!”

It’s easy to think that survival skills in the wild is an outdated talent for people like us. Yet, just a glance at the footage of Sandy, Katrina, Haiti and so many of Nature’s other targets, we would be fools to assume that we were invulnerable. The New Survival Skills’ leader offers another very persuasive pitch for taking their course:

“My life was changed for the better when I went into the woods as a camper.  I was put into a group with six other boys who had never met each other before and we were assigned a counselor who had the pleasure of our company in the wild for two whole weeks. We learned things that city boys did not know, like how to fish with just a line, hook and a worm, which we had to find in the dirt. We learned how to start fires without matches, how to find water, use a compass, how to ride horses and most of all we learned that survival in the woods was no game, but a test of one’s skills.  The one skill that I know was most important one taught to us was the ability to work together as a team to overcome some of the harshest country in the U.S. Later in life I had more hands-on training in wilderness survival from some of the best in the business with the U.S. Military, and put my skills and training in the wild to work as a Wildland Firefighter for a few years on a hand crew in Northern California. Now, I feel today more than ever before, that the same skills I  learned in the woods gave me the leadership skills to be a success in my professional life as well as opening my eyes to the things that have become of interest to me. I love and respect the outdoors and anything wild. My heritage is also Native American (Oglala, Lakota Sioux) and I feel a deep draw to the wilderness and doing what I can to help others see what beauty there is in it and how to respect it.”   Chappy

 

 

Comments

  1. says

    I would love to get trained on survival skills from those military guys. The best thing about Solar tools is that it lets you enjoy the outdoors and still carry technology along with you.