Harbor Freight Parking Lot Sale – June 8-10!!

Spread the word– the famous Harbor Freight Tools Parking Lot Sale is back!

This weekend hundreds of factory-discontinued, clearance and closeout products are being liquidated, making room for new inventory– and that’s great news for those waiting for just the right moment to buy that generator, power tool, air compressor, tool cart, etc. Shop early for the best selection, or take your chances and wait as the prices get lower and lower every day– up to 50% off Friday, up to 60% off Saturday, and up to 70% off Sunday!

And while you’re at it, throw some of the great “Under $5″ Deals in your basket– everyday items at “impossible-to-pass” prices.

Now’s the time to get the tools you’re looking for! Find a Harbor Freight Tools near you, or shop huge deals on their website this weekend!

Harbor Freight Grand Opening – Kansas City, MO

June 6, 2012 – A ribbon cutting ceremony, hosted by the Northland Regional and Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce, was held at 11am yesterday, celebrating the grand opening of a new Harbor Freight Tools in Kansas City, MO. Located at 395 NW Barry Road, Kansas City, this marks the 388th Harbor Freight Tools store nationwide, and the eighth in Missouri. The opening is accompanied by a colossal sale– with merchandise priced as much as 80% off!

Come join the party, take advantage of the incredible specials, or just come by and say “Hi!”

Store hours are MON-SAT 8:00AM-9:00PM and SUN 9:00AM-6:00PM.

See you there!

A Marriage Made on Wheels

In the March/April 1939 issue of Popular Homecraft a story ran, along with detailed plans, for something that was dubbed the “Honeymoon House Trailer…”

…designed and built by Louis Rogers of Pasadena, California. He had literally saved his dimes and built this little gem back in the 30’s, to take his new bride on their wedding trip. The 8’x4’ floor plan was had tongue-and-groove flooring on a pine chassis, and Rogers used a Chevy front axle with 28” wheels and 1926 rear fenders.  The odd little trailer slept two and had a raise-up deck lid for a rear kitchenette, with ice box and stove. A curtain-enclosure outside the starboard entry served at the “dressing room.” The teardrop trailer was born.

DIYers went crazy. They used Rogers’ plans, and soon added touches of their own. After World War II, the trailer evolved with models sporting Jeep wheels and exterior skins made from bombers’ wings. After the 50’s, their popularity started dropping when larger RVs appeared, but then returned with a vengeance. Today you can find a number of websites for plans (some free!), photo galleries, forums and clubs. Teardrop trailer enthusiasts believe that creating, renovating and modifying their own models are what give the little campers their timelessness—and the most rewarding way to own a teardrop!

I first noticed the teardrop trailer when surfing for a tent trailer to take on road trips. From time to time, “teardrop trailer” results would pop up, and eventually I started clicking on them. My first impressions: These critters are small… they’re cute… wow, they’re equipped… oh wow, they’re cool! The best of the bunch, IMHO, were the homemade models. They remind me of the Pinewood Derby race cars we made as kids—there were always a couple that hijacked the event, they were so amazing.

I also saw that the Harbor Freight utility trailer was a favorite for the frame, particularly the Haul-Master 1195 lb. 4’x8’ foldable trailer

Harbor Freight Utility Trailer

…and 1720 lb 4’x8’ Super Duty model.


Harbor Freight 4 x 8 Utility Trailer

There seems to be a controversy over whether or not a foldable utility trailer should be used, but as is shown in the above photo, they’ve proven to be very capable. This model


–aptly named “Woody,” is a simple, classic example of the DIY teardrop trailer. When I asked Steve Edling, the site owner, to use a picture of Woody for this article, he graciously consented and added that a number of Harbor Freight tools were also used in its creation. Indeed, Kuffel Kreek, a provider of teardrop trailer plans, lists several must-have Harbor Freight tools one should get before starting, including a brad nailer, air shears and angle grinder.

Type in phrases like “teardrop trailer harbor freight” on Google and you’ll get tons of sites—including a few YouTube videos—that talk about using Harbor Freight’s utility trailers in their projects. This isn’t just because the trailers are inexpensive—it’s because they’re rugged, reliable, durable AND inexpensive. I mean, if you’re going to invest all that time, sweat, and money (and probably a pint or two of blood) in this labor of love, would you risk the integrity of its frame? Neither would I.

The American-born DIY teardrop trailer is more than just a cool, little camper. It’s a gratifying project of personal expression, something you can climb into and go to sleep knowing, you built this! It’s not an easy project—as noted on Kuffel Kreek, “Anything that bounces down the highway at 65 MPH isn’t easy”—and if you’ve never built anything before, forget it (I should probably hone my skills a tad more before I attempt it), It also takes space and time. But the payoff is awesome, and your teardrop trailer will retain its value much longer than any other RV on the road.

Check out this great photo gallery which includes several teardrop trailers!

New Product Alert: Chicago Electric Cut-Off Saw

It’s a given Harbor Freight’s got a huge catalog of affordable hand & power tools– that’s why so many out there love the store and keep going back. Not only do they find the tools they need a lot cheaper than other places, they even find stuff they just can’t get anywhere else. And that catalog keeps on getting bigger!

Introducing the Chicago Electric  Electric 3″ High Speed Cut-Off Tool, offered exclusively at Harbor Freight.

Electric Cutoff Saw

This amazing cut-off tool delivers the power to cut through metal like butter, and includes features such as:

  • High speed (22,000 RPMs) to cut through pipe, tubing, sheet metal, exhaust systems, and fasteners with ease
  • Perfect size, power, and comfort for auto body work
  • Comfortable molded grip
  • Safety trigger to prevent accidental start-up
  • Lightweight– only 3.2 lbs
  • Uses standard 3″ cutting discs
  • Doesn’t need an air compressor

But, don’t listen to me– check out the video and watch this baby in action!

Harbor Freight Gets Up In Your Grill

Surfing for BBQ-ing tips the other day, I wandered into some chat forums where it’s “All-Barbecue, All the Time.” Make no mistake, those “Q-ers” are serious about cooking their meat. The best cuts, types of fuel, which wood for smoking, the tools, curing, venting, seasoning & preparing, temps and times. To them, grilling a steak is like customizing a car– the body may be pretty, but it’s all about what goes under the hood.

Not happy with their out-of-the-box units, some guys retrofit their BBQ grills (as I said, like a car). For example, Phil Lee of Hawg Heaven Smokin’ Barbecue modified his smoker…

bbq mod

…with 10” air tires (#30900) to better deal with mobility on lawns, parks, campsites and such.

My favorite modification is the BBQ trailer: A Q-er will either remove the legs from their BBQ grill, and then bolt or weld them onto a utility trailer, or build one up from scratch–making them über-mobile! Here’s a great example of a customized, homemade barbecue trailer– created by a fellow named Spankerchief– on SmokingMeatForums.com

bbq smoker trailer

…using the Haul-Master 1720 Lb. Capacity Super Duty 48″ X 96″ Utility Trailer with 12” Wheels (#94564). In fact, every BBQ forum I clicked on had at least one thread where an adventurous “trailer Q-er” incorporated a Haul-Master utility trailer from Harbor Freight. Several put their projects together using the popular & affordable Chicago Electric 90 Amp Flux Wire Welder (#68887).

The online BBQ cooks were all loaded for bear with gear that supported their grilling operations. The Propane Torch with Igniter (#91037) was a favorite– for its turbo performance and for its great, low price. The Instant Read Digital Thermometer (#95382) was also popular, for its accuracy and, again, price. Also included were the Compact Food Slicer (#42787), Electric Meat Grinder (#99598) and plenty of protective wear like nitrile, PVC-dipped and/or welding gloves.

Needless to say, I was bitten by the BBQ bug and ended up getting a “barrel-style” barbecue grill with smoker side box, as well as the igniter and thermometer. I also picked up this pair of welding gloves, and, of course, a BBQ cookbook. I’ll probably get the 10” wheels next (they look cool).

Now all I have to do is experiment on the meat and hope I don’t burn anything vital… like Sunday dinner.