Super Streetbike Review: 1/5 HP Airbrush Compressor

When it comes to riding your motorcycle, it’s not enough that it just runs good– you gotta look good. So make sure you check out Super Streetbike’s April 2013 issue (no, not the cover, lug nut– I’m talking about YOU looking good).

On page 58 there’s a nifty article on “Helmet Painting”– a cool, inexpensive way to self-express on the road. But, as writer Brian Hatano points out, you need more than a creative idea to get your point across; it takes technique. So, he takes you through every step you probably don’t think about when  imagining that wicked skull with flames and roses… namely, preparation, detail, method and materials. To get the hang of the spray gun skills, though, Brian suggests we first get the feel of it with a practice helmet:

“For practice jobs, any helmet will work, but starting with a lid in good condition will require less initial prep and give you more time to think about designs and color combinations.”

He then breaks down the process of executing a successful paint job– from disassembling the helmet to applying the clear coat– in crystal, concise detail. Great intel to have for when you’re ready to go for it.

Interesting, however, is that even though Brian was working in a shop equipped with a large air compressor, he opted instead to go with the Central Pneumatic 1/5 HP, 58 PSI Airbrush Compressor.

“Although we had a full size compressor available, we tried out the Harbor Freight Central Pneumatic 1/5th HP Airbrush Compressor and it performed better than units costing twice as much. Zac noted the quiet motor with no pulsing in the air supply.”

Constructed of sturdy anodized aluminum, the airbrush compressor is easy to clean and operate, and changing colors is a cinch. The airbrush kit works with lacquers, oils and latex-based paints to create pro-quality designs only limited by your imagination! It comes with a 22cc glass jar, 5cc metal cop and 5-ft. air hose– and, at a low $88.99, it’ll pay for itself over and over again!

While you’re shopping, also be sure to pick up the Central Pneumatic Quick-Change Airbrush Kit for just $11.99. This enables you to switch out paints in a flash with next-to-no downtime.

This awesome setup would also be perfect for custom painting:

  • Bike frames
  • R/C and other models
  • Auto body detail art
  • Tool boxes or cabinets
  • Furniture
  • Pottery
  • Metal sculpting
  • Signs and murals
  • Crafts
  • Toys
  • Cosmetic and Halloween makeup
  • Spray tanning
  • …and so much more!

Also, of course, if you want to support the team at the big game.

 

Dirt Biker’s Review: The 2.5 Liter Ultrasonic Cleaner

Recently, a forum member on the Honda dirt bike site XR650RForum.com, calling himself Master_E, shared with his buddies his experience with the Chicago Electric 2.5 Liter Ultrasonic Cleaner.

“So I bought this thing because I took my carb to a buddies house the first time I was taking it apart and we used his. My carb had gunk all over and was generally dirty from being used. This ultrasonic gizzmo cleaned my carb to the point where it looked fresh out of a hot tank, inside and out. I was very impressed.”

When he took it home, he tried different cleaners with it. One different work. Another was so sotrong, it would tarnish. Finally, he found the perfect “solution”:

“I went back to Harbor Freight and bought a gallon of this business they use in their regular parts washers for only $9.99. I run a 50/50 mix with water and it cleans fantastically. Straight out of the jug is pretty concentrated stuff. I really recommend diluting it some.”

And once he figured out the formula, he threw everything he could find into the cleaner.

“Since, I’ve used it on all kinds of things. Most useful to me has been on fasteners but greasy nuts, bolts, washers, brackets, spacers, sprockets, clutch and brake perches, cleaning up my tools, my carburetor components, suspension components and even a whole chain. Yes, the whole chain.”

Besides motorcycle and automotive parts, the 2.5 Ultrasonic Cleaner is great for cleaning gun parts and brass, jewelry, coins, brasswind parts, pinball machine parts, e-cigarette tanks, medals, eyeglasses, tattoo tubes, grips and tips, bionic parts, coffee ground cups, and so much more! It works with our without heat, and is programmed for five cleaning cycles. At only $74.99, it’s a great machine at a great price.

Now, back to Master_E:

“So I thought I’d share a couple before and afters. I actually struggled to find things that needed cleaning, but I did find a couple things. These parts were never prep’d or polished after coming out of the cleaner. They went straight in, ran a cycle then brought out and dried off. Thats it. No scrubbing, no brushing, no scraping, no wiping down with a rag at all.”

(Click on the pics to enlarge)

Wheel Spacers: Before…

…and After!

 

 

Upper Triple Bearing: Before…

… and After…

… and More After!

 

 

Upper Triple Clamp: Before…

… in the Cleaner (didn’t quite fit)…

… and After…

… and After!

You can’t argue with the evidence. The Chicago Electric 2.5 Liter Ultrasonic Cleaner is a perfect addition to any workshop or home where parts  and pieces get dirty. Go get yours now– and don’t forget to take a 20% Off coupon!

To quote Master_E’s parting remark:

“Cheers! Now go clean some stuff!”

Happy New Year! Now Get Down to Zihuatanejo

I hope everyone had as nice and relaxing holiday as I did. Besides getting lots of badly needed downtime, we managed to see old friends, family and haunts, and accumulated new memories to add to the ol’ mental scrapbook.

Over the last few days, as I was dreading the end of my vacation and return to the real world, I pondered resolutions for 2013– both the realistic ones and the “not-a-snowball’s-chance-in-hell-but-I-should-probably-make-them-anyway” ones. Typically, these goals are exercises in futility. This time, though, it occurred to me that it isn’t so much what you resolve to do as much as how you plan to make it happen. As I’m sure many of you are, I’m a big fan of The Shawshank Redemption. That whole “get busy living, or get busy dying” rant impressed me like, “yeah… that’s it. That’s how it is.” In the movie, Andy Dufresne determined his “get busy living” was finding a way out of Shawshank and escaping to a little Mexican village called Zihuatanejo. It’s the perfect metaphor for anything we truly want.

So you need to first ask yourself, what more than anything would you like to do. It could be turning the garage into a man cave or craft studio, fixing all the broken things around the house, restoring your dad’s dead Olds 442 or finally overhauling the backyard. But, before getting lost in your fantasy and dreaming of neat that would be…

…immediately follow up with, okay… how do I make it happen? In other words, you can’t just think about what you need to start doing– do it. Do it now. Even if you just devote 10 minutes a day, moving boxes or trimming hedges or removing engine parts, the very act of doing something motivates you to get moving, add more time and effort. and get it done. This year for me, it’s not just about losing weight (yeah, I’m original), it’s about walking, power-walking, doing stairs or hiking every day. NOT jumping into a gym membership– that’s just setting myself up for disaster (not to mention thwarting my budgetary resolutions). Also, choosing the types of food I eat by imagining what kind of hell my body goes through processing what I feed it (reality check: sweet potato fries is NOT a healthy alternative to regular potato fries). Again, not what you do, but how you do it.

On a sort-of related note, but not really, I have a brother-in-law who’s a total Tim Taylor (Home Improvement), grunts and all, and whose name I had for Christmas. I gave him a Harbor Freight gift card (of course), but, for me, just giving a gift card’s a cop out; it has to at least be accompanied by something that requires personal thought and consideration. So, I gave him a copy of Sequoia Publishing’s Pocket Ref.

Super handy info for tool hounds, craftsmen, landscapers, mechanics, technicians, cooks, stagehands, maintenance workers, carpenters, installers, fabricators, testers, designers, rodeo clowns– anyone who works with tools or does general troubleshooting– this comprehensive, pocket-sized reference book is for anyone who does anything. It’s perfect for when you use a math formula infrequently enough to forget it– and it’s better than the Internet ’cause it goes places where you get no bars! The little book is 768 pages of charts, tables, conversions, constants, facts and figures on everything you’d want to know. Covers air and gasses, automotive, carpentry and construction, chemistry and physics, computers, general science, geology, electrical circuits, electronics, drilling, cutting, adhesives, bolts, fasteners, pipes, ropes, tools, weather, welding, time zones, bunches of tables. and tons more– AND it fits in a pocket, glove box or tool box! Excluding Taco Bell, I can’t think of a better way to spend $9.99.

My brother-in-law flipped after he scanned through it for the first time. “Hell,” he said, “I can see myself just sitting and reading this for fun.” I recommended the bathroom.

Not for nothing, but an interesting aside,  Jamie and Adam on MythBusters whip this book out from time to time and use formulas from it. Well… I was impressed.

 

The Multitasking Multifunction Tool

It was a really dumb procrastination. A broomstick, cut to be a patio sliding door jamb as an added security– except it was about 1/2″ too long, and for the longest time, just propped up at an angle. It was an eye sore, classic jerry-rigging in the spirit of the copper penny and chewing gum. I told my wife for weeks that I’d take care of it, but the thought of sawing that little stub off the end sounded like such a royal pain, I kept putting it off.

Of course I knew about the Chicago Electric multi-function tools. They’re some of Harbor freight Tools’ bestsellers and favorites in the toolhead community. It’s just another thing I was putting off– going out to get the tool. Ha!

There are different models to choose from, all with the same professional-quality performance:

Why buy several power tools when one incredible tool can tackle so many jobs by itself? The corded Chicago Electric Multifunction Single-Speed Power Tool is the basic weapon of choice for all the small-to-midsize cutting, scraping, sanding and sawing projects on your to-do list.  This professional quality, yet very affordable, multifunction tool powers at 21,000 oscillations per minute, putting to put some real muscle into the tough jobs. The multi-tool easily cuts through cable, air ducts, downspouts, plasterboard and pipes… sands down cement, concrete, stone, plaster, tile adhesive, paint and wood . . . it can even saw through wood up to 2″ thick! It’s the “go-to” tool for remodeling and repair jobs, as well as hobbies, tile, car repairs, even scraping freshly painted windows or old floor coverings!

 

For a little more money, you can get the same versatile tool with variable speeds– raging from 10,000 to 20,000 oscillations per minute– and including 4 multi-function attachments! The Chicago Electric Multifunction Power Tool, Variable Speed Oscillating features the same rugged die cast aluminum gear housing and sealed bearings, and with the variable power and included attachments, it becomes even more power tools-in-one!

 

Going forward, we move on to the Chicago Electric Cordless Oscillating Multifunction Tool. If there isn’t a convenient plug around, or you just like the freedom of a cordless tool, this is the ticket. With speeds up to 15,000 oscillations per minute, this cordless tool is fast and tough enough to handle the difficult jobs as well as fine detail work. Like the others, it can cut through plastic, cable, air ducts, downspouts, plasterboard and pipes. Its unique spindle and blade arbor design positively locks the blade in 7 forward positions for added versatility. Attach the sanding pad and sand down cement, concrete, stone, plaster, wood, tile adhesive and paint. This cordless multifunction tool is ideal tool for home remodeling, auto repair and a whole lot of other jobs! Be sure to get a second battery you don’t find yourself with downtime in the middle of a project.

 

 

Finally, we come to the Central Pneumatic Variable Speed Multifunction Air Model. Whether it’s a tough job or detailed work, the variable speed multifunction air tool provides the solution. A great, little tool for the hard-to-get-into areas, it’s ideal for cutting cabinets, underdoor frames, ABS pipe, for Terrazzo restoration & more. The multiple attachments make it easy to cut wood 3/8″ deep… plastic, wallboard and more, scrape away linoleum, laminate and adhesives, remove grout, sand wood or metal– the list goes on! The unique spindle and blade arbor design positively locks in 7 forward positions for added versatility. At 90 psi air pressure, it powers up to speeds of 17,000 OPM!

Whatever style you choose, you’ll find your Chicago Electric multifunction tool to be an invaluable addition to your DIY arsenal. Also, be sure to check out the collection of available attachments to accommodate any and all your mutlitool needs.

Harbor Freight for Halloween!

In the “Thinking Outside of the Box” category, Jennifer B. of Wilmington, NC wins for ingenuity and getting into the Halloween spirit. Recently, she purchased a Drill Master 80 Piece Rotary Tool Kit to carve her jack-o-lantern, and while this picture only shows a “pumpkin in progress”, it’s so amazing right now, we can tell it’s going to be epic when it’s done (beware pumpkin-kicking punks, Jen)!

 

It’s not too late to follow Jennifer’s example– run down to your local Harbor Freight and pick up your rotary tool kit today! Imagine the works of art you could make out of squash-genus vegetables. Not just for pumpkins, though, this awesome tool is great for cutting, grinding, polishing, sharpening, engraving and drilling for all kinds of crafts and hobbies. Works on metal, wood, rock, plastic… and your dog’s toenails. Seriously!

And at such a low price, it’s just downright SCARY to pass such a deal up!

Melting a Rainbow

Being a former retail store worker I’ve always associated heat guns with shrink wrapping product. In fact, this was probably my favorite part of any number of retail jobs I had. There is just something satisfying about watching the plastic shrink to perfection. And if I accidentally shrank the wrap too much to where it started to rip, well that just meant I got to rip it off and start over again! It was hard for me to imagine how there could be a more fun use of a heat gun – at least until I started reading about the things people do with Harbor Freight heat guns (I’m serious!). People have been known to use them to do things as unexpected as roast coffee and make nachos (did someone say nachos?!).

1500 Watt Dual Temperature Heat Gun

The versatile 1500 Watt Dual Temperature Heat Gun. Use it to strip paint, loosen fittings, thaw pipes, make nachos, or create crayon art!

Lately, I’ve been finding crafty people around the internet using heat guns to make melted crayon art. This relatively simple idea is a great project for older children or a way to get some vibrant color into any room. To get an idea of the how-to and final product of melted crayon art, check out this finished piece from makoodle.com.

Melted Crayon Art from makoodle.com

Made with Harbor Freight Tools! Learn how-to at makoodle.com

Over at loveandlaundry.com they turned melted crayon art into a rainbow of teacher appreciation. Now Mrs. Wilson and Ms. Dawson will have fancy colorful name plates for their classrooms!

Personalized Melted Crayon Art

Personalized Melted Crayon ArtAlso made with Harbor Freight Tools! Learn how-to at loveandlaundry.com

So tell me, dear readers, how do you use your Harbor Freight Tools heat gun?

’67 Firebird Restoration Project: Part 3 – Engine Removal!

Welcome to the third installment of the Harbor Freight Tools 1967 Firebird Restoration Project.

For first-time readers: HFT invited Jeff Tann– car enthusiast and former Rod & Custom editor — to fully restore the legendary muscle car using only discount tools from Harbor Freight. The car is all original, with a 400/325-hp V8 engine, so he’s basically tackling the project “from scratch.”

In Part 1, we were given a tour of the original vehicle, inside and out, and presented Jeff’s challenge. In Part 2, we followed the body-dismantling process and introduced the U.S. General 700 lb. Capacity 5-Drawer Rolling Tool Cart, which housed the Pittsburgh Professional 301-Piece Mechanic’s Tool Kit. Also in this segment, we saw how Jeff made quick business of the job with a Central Pneumatic 3/8″ Professional Air Ratchet and 1/4″ Mini Air Ratchet Wrench.

This time we follow Jeff as he lifts the engine, using a 2-Ton Capacity Foldable Shop Crane. It’s probably the first time the 45-year-old engine’s been taken out since it was on the assembly line, so it’s not gonna be pretty. Jeff then removes the tranny from the engine with a Central Pneumatic 1/2″ Twin Hammer Air Impact Wrench before he mounts it on the Central Machinery 1000 Lb. Engine Stand, and proceeds to take it apart.

Remote Possibilities

What do you think of when you think “Harbor Freight?” Tools, right? Maybe generators or gas engines or solar panels or parts washers– certainly not radio-controlled models. And yet, Harbor Freight’s got a nice little selection of RC craft, including planes, cars, a helicopter and a speedboat!

Venom Ozone RC Helicopter

The Venom Ozone 3.5 Channel Remote Controlled Helicopter is a particular favorite in the stores and on the Harbor Freight website. Sporting twin 130 brushed motors, it’s easy to fly, easy to land, and is ready to launch in minutes. Durable, responsive and a blast to fly!

 

P51 Mustang

Modeled after the fearsome long-range fighter-bomber that took out over 4,950 aircraft in World War II, the RC P51 Mustang is pre-built and ready to fly within minutes. Operating via a 4-channel, 72 mHz digital proportional radio control system, this awesome warrior soars with amazing speed and handling, and operates at up to a 1,600-ft. range.

 

RC Speedboat

Here’s a great way to pass the time when the fishing is slow. Harbor Freight’s radio-controlled Speedboat will go fast enough to shoot up a rooster tail,  maneuvers like a dream, and will keep you captivated for hours. For a great read, check out the customer reviews to see how some folks modified their boats for even bigger performance. A lot of power for a remarkably low price.

Check out these and the other RC cars and planes– in the store and online!

 

 

The HFT ’67 Firebird Restoration Project: Part 2 – Disassembly!

Welcome to the second installment of the Harbor Freight Tools 1967 Firebird Restoration Project. As previously noted, HFT invited Jeff Tann– car enthusiast and former Rod & Custom editor–to fully restore the legendary muscle car using only low-priced tools sold at Harbor Freight. The car is all original, with a 400/325-hp V8 engine, so he’s basically tackling the project “from scratch.”

In Part 1, we were introduced to the vehicle, inside and out, and presented Jeff’s challenge. In this segment we watch the dismantling process. As Dr. Albert Hirsch had to break down David Webb before he could build Jason Bourne, so Jeff has to take apart the old, battle-weary Firebird before he can build… a classic, hotter Firebird!

To get the ball rolling, his garage was equipped with a U.S. General 700 lb. Capacity 5-Drawer Rolling Tool Cart, which was stocked with a Pittsburgh Professional 301-Piece Mechanic’s Tool Kit. Also used in this segment, the Central Pneumatic 3/8″ Professional Air Ratchet and 1/4″ Mini Air Ratchet Wrench.

During the display, it was suggested that you should keep the bolts, nuts, washers, etc., for each portion together in ziplock bags– and who doesn’t have a horror story that supports that?

Stay tuned… the best stuff’s still ahead!

The HFT ’67 Firebird Restoration Project: Part 1

How good is Harbor Freight Tools, really? To find out, Jeff Tann– car enthusiast and former Rod & Custom editor–will fully restore a 1967 Pontiac Firebird using only tools sold at Harbor Freight. Starting today, we’ll follow his progress.

In the first installment of this 12-part series, let’s look at the muscle car as it was originally presented to Jeff. As you can see, the Firebird– all original– isn’t in terrible shape, but definitely has seen the wear of time and use. Even so, we’re looking at an American classic, and wouldn’t it be awesome to see it return to its 100% perfection?


Each week we’ll cover another phase of the project, until we see it through to its completion. Starting next week, we’ll start with removing the engine.

Follow with us and witness firsthand how the affordable, quality tools at Harbor Freight perform in this most challenging exercise.