10 in. 2.5 HP Tile/Brick Saw

The remodeler’s best friend

Growing up, we were taught not to mix water and electricity. So, when it comes to remodeling projects, we may be hesitant at first to use a tile saw which utilizes water and electricity—and a diamond rim rotating blade! But you needn’t worry because there’s no better way to cut a voluminous amount of tile or other masonry materials than with a tile saw, also known as a “wet saw.”

The Chicago Electric 10 in. 2.5 HP Tile/Brick Saw is a must-have for remodeling with tile, brink and other masonry.


The two-position cutting head enables you to adjust the blade for a variety of materials up to 3-1/2 inches thick and 24 inches in length or width. You can also make 22.5° and 45° bevel cuts. The tile saw includes a 3-gallon per minute water pump and high-impact ABS water tub that’s easy to clean. Additional features include a powerful dual capacity motor with sealed bearings and thermal overload protection, heavy-duty cast alloy column and cutting head for reduced vibration and an oversized steel frame with a precision linear bar system for smooth operation. The folding stand with wheels and diamond blade shown are sold separately.

If you’re never used a tile saw before, here are a few tips to get you started.

 


Position the tile saw on a solid and level surface. Sawing on a wobbly table could result in inaccurate cuts and potential injury.

 


Fill the tile saw’s reservoir with clean water—use a garden hose or pitcher. Make sure that the water pump is completely submerged.

 


Position the tile onto the cutting board. Adjust the fence so the blade lines up with the pencil mark demarcating where the cut should be. Keep the widest part of the tile between the fence and the blade so you can keep your hand as far from the blade as possible.

For cutting tiles along the diagonal, position a miter guide or speed square between the tile and the fence.

When making partial cuts, for example, an L-shaped cut to fit around an electrical outlet, set up the cut the same way but only feed the tile far enough into the blade as needed.

 


Position the tile, turn on the saw and make sure water is being sprayed onto the blade before cutting the tile.

 


Use a steady grip to feed the tile slowly into the blade, especially toward the edges of the tile as this is where the most breakage can occur. Do not force the cut.

 


When the cut is complete, carefully pull the pieces away and turn off the saw. Position the next tile for cutting and repeat the steps above.

Additional safety notes:

The water keeps the blade and tile cool and helps prevent particles from flying around. The water should flow freely around the entire cutting edge of the blade. If not, don’t begin cutting as this could damage the blade as well as the tile and potentially cause serious injury.

Always keep your hands away from the line of the cut to prevent injury.

Always wear safety glasses to prevent particles from injuring your eyes.

 


To insure electrical safety, it’s best to create a “drip loop.” See the illustrations above. Notice how the loop is lower than the outlet so water does not drip into the outlet.

The Chicago Electric 10 in. 2.5 HP Tile/Brick Saw is an unbeatable value—many customers have expressed how it’s cheaper to buy this tile saw than to rent one from a big box store.  The only problem is there will be no excuse not to tackle more remodeling jobs! Check out other tile saws and accessories available from Harbor Freight or visit your local Harbor Freight Tools store.

 

 

Source material:
wikihow
thespruce

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